Great conversation Starter For Picking Up Women During The Day

www.succeedatdating.com When approaching women the next time you try some daygame try this opener to start the conversation. TAGS PUA,pickup artist,opener,alex,coulson,mystery,method,the pickup artist,vh1,tv show,neil strauss,the game,pick up women,girls,pua artist,day game,pick up women on video
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How Any Man Can Become a Guru of Dating- Simple, Easy & Great Dating Tips Collection

How Any Man Can Become a Guru of Dating- Simple, Easy & Great Dating Tips Collection

How Any Man Can Become a Guru of Dating is somewhat an introduction of some unique down-to-earth real strategies, which I have collected from time to time. I have seen several not-so-handsome men dating with beauties and concluded that though looks play a part, but not so significant as everybody might think. Money, looks and career are, of course, undeniable realities of life.

Sun Tzu a famous Chinese strategist has written in his book the Art of War that if you know the enemy, this

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Listen, Ari, we’ve been a great comedy team for 32 years. But I think we need to come up with some new jokes that will appeal to this … this Facebook generation, whatever that is.

A few nice dating tips for men images I found:

Listen, Ari, we’ve been a great comedy team for 32 years. But I think we need to come up with some new jokes that will appeal to this … this Facebook generation, whatever that is.
dating tips for men

Image by Ed Yourdon
Note: this photo was published in an Jun 6, 2011 issue of Everyblock NYC zipcodes blog titled "10023." It was also published in a Sep 8, 2011 Dating Tips for Women blog, with the same caption and detailed notes that I had written on this Flickr page.

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This is a continuation of Flickr sets that I created in 2010 (shown here), 2009 (shown here), and 2008 (shown here) — which, collectively, illustrate a variety of scenes and people in the small "pocket park" known as Verdi Square, located at 72nd Street and Broadway in New York City’s Upper West Side, right by the 72nd St. IRT subway station.

I typically visit a local gym once or twice a week, and I get there by taking the downtown IRT express from my home (at 96th Street) down to the 72nd Street stop. Whenever possible, I try to schedule an extra 30-60 minutes to sit quietly on one of the park benches, and just watch the flow of people coming in and out of the park — sometimes just passing through, to get from 72nd Street up to 73rd Street, but mostly entering or exiting the subway station.

You see all kinds of people here: students, bums, tourists, office workers, homeless people, retired people, babysitters, children, soldiers, sanitation workers, lovers, friends, dogs, cats, pigeons, and a few things that simply defy description. Sometimes you see the same people over and over again; sometimes they follow a regular pattern at a particular time of the day.

If I focus on the people entering the park at 73rd Street, and walking southwards toward the subway entrance, I typically have five or ten seconds to (a) decide if they’re sufficiently interesting to bother photographing,(b) wait for them to get in a position where I can get a clear shot of them, and (c) focus my camera on them and take several shots, in the hope that at least one or two of them will be well-focused and really interesting.

While you might get the impression that I photograph every single person who moves through this park, it’s actually just the opposite: the vast majority of people that I see here are just not all that interesting. (It’s not that they’re ugly, it’s just that there’s nothing interesting, memorable, or distinctive about them.) Even so, I might well take, say, 200 shots in the space of an hour. But some of them are repetitive or redundant, and others are blurred or out-of-focus, or technically defective in some other way. Of the ones that survive this kind of scrutiny, many turn out to be well-focused, nicely-composed, but … well … just "okay". I’ll keep them on my computer, just in case, but I don’t bother uploading them.

Typically, only about 5-10% of the photos I’ve taken get uploaded to Flickr — e.g., about 10 photos from a one-hour session in which a thousand, or more, people have walked past me. There are some exceptions to this rule of thumb, as was the case with this particular set — but nevertheless, what you’re seeing it is indeed only a tiny, tiny subset of the "real" street scene in New York City. On the other hand, it is reassuring to see that there are at least a few "interesting" people in a city that often has a reputation of being mean, cold, and heartless…v

That man back there is staring at me. I can just feel it …
dating tips for men

Image by Ed Yourdon
Note: this photo was published in an Apr 24, 2011 Everyblock NYC zipcodes blog titled "10023." It was also published in a May 7, 201 ""Dating Tips for Women"" blog with the same caption and detailed notes that I wrote on this Flickr page. And it was published in a Jun 15, 2011 blog titled "Einheitliche Dating? First Date Tipps, damit Ihr Second Date."

****************************************

This is a continuation of Flickr sets that I created in 2010 (shown here), 2009 (shown here), and 2008 (shown here) — which, collectively, illustrate a variety of scenes and people in the small "pocket park" known as Verdi Square, located at 72nd Street and Broadway in New York City’s Upper West Side, right by the 72nd St. IRT subway station.

I typically visit a local gym once or twice a week, and I get there by taking the downtown IRT express from my home (at 96th Street) down to the 72nd Street stop. Whenever possible, I try to schedule an extra 30-60 minutes to sit quietly on one of the park benches, and just watch the flow of people coming in and out of the park — sometimes just passing through, to get from 72nd Street up to 73rd Street, but mostly entering or exiting the subway station.

You see all kinds of people here: students, bums, tourists, office workers, homeless people, retired people, babysitters, children, soldiers, sanitation workers, lovers, friends, dogs, cats, pigeons, and a few things that simply defy description. Sometimes you see the same people over and over again; sometimes they follow a regular pattern at a particular time of the day.

If I focus on the people entering the park at 73rd Street, and walking southwards toward the subway entrance, I typically have five or ten seconds to (a) decide if they’re sufficiently interesting to bother photographing,(b) wait for them to get in a position where I can get a clear shot of them, and (c) focus my camera on them and take several shots, in the hope that at least one or two of them will be well-focused and really interesting.

While you might get the impression that I photograph every single person who moves through this park, it’s actually just the opposite: the vast majority of people that I see here are just not all that interesting. (It’s not that they’re ugly, it’s just that there’s nothing interesting, memorable, or distinctive about them.) Even so, I might well take, say, 200 shots in the space of an hour. But some of them are repetitive or redundant, and others are blurred or out-of-focus, or technically defective in some other way. Of the ones that survive this kind of scrutiny, many turn out to be well-focused, nicely-composed, but … well … just "okay". I’ll keep them on my computer, just in case, but I don’t bother uploading them.

Typically, only about 5-10% of the photos I’ve taken get uploaded to Flickr — e.g., about 10 photos from a one-hour session in which a thousand, or more, people have walked past me. There are some exceptions to this rule of thumb, as was the case with this particular set — but nevertheless, what you’re seeing it is indeed only a tiny, tiny subset of the "real" street scene in New York City. On the other hand, it is reassuring to see that there are at least a few "interesting" people in a city that often has a reputation of being mean, cold, and heartless…

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