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Cool Toys Pic of the Day – Branch
relationship advice

Image by rosefirerising
Branch:
branch.com/

What is Branch.com? Well, that is what I’m still trying to figure out
honestly. It seems to be something of a curation tool (similar to Storify)
mixed with a question and answer forum (like Quora) with a dash of comment
threads (see Disqus) thrown in for good measure. This site allows you to
add some content, it could be a Tweet, webpage, or original content. You
then invite people to the conversation and watch it take on a life of its
own by branching off into tangents or as the genesis to new conversations.

You can invite as many or as few participants as you would like. You can
close a thread at any time. If you have excluded someone from the thread,
they can still branch off of a comment to start their own thread. There
was some talk about using it as an enterprise sharing system because of the
hyper-curational moderation abilities and it could possibly be used for
project management.

The new “Groups” feature allows you to invite people to groups and then
share amongst each other at any time. This I could see as being
particularly handy for building relationships in teams like those I had to
work in my first semester as a grad student. We didn’t have a lot of time
outside of class to get to know each other, so using a tool like this would
have been helpful to get background information or build consensus in the
group without taking up valuable meeting time. At the same time, we could
share other things that we wanted to get their opinion about and get to
know each other personally as well as professionally.

Branch suggests using its service for publishing original ideas, asking
friends for advice, having a public debate, and sharing media and memories.
Much like Storify, branches can be embedded in other media, so they can be
published to blogs or websites once the conversation has ended. The
service is still trying to gain some traction, but the early adopters seem
to really enjoy it. The staff seems very responsive and are visible
commenting on several branches about the service itself.

There are discovery tools for viewing new branches as well as popular ones.
From the small amount I have done, there also seems to be a recommendation
tool that populates branches you might like based on the content of
branches you have started. Overall, we will have to see if it can find a
niche, but I would definitely consider using it for small group work
especially when laying initial groundwork using a branch can help open up
agenda time for other matters.

This is a guest post by Chris Bulin (@Arduanne), a graduate student
assistant at the Taubman Health Sciences Library.

[image: Inline image 1][image: Inline image 2]

Cool Toys Pic of the Day – Branch
relationship advice

Image by rosefirerising
Branch:
branch.com/

What is Branch.com? Well, that is what I’m still trying to figure out
honestly. It seems to be something of a curation tool (similar to Storify)
mixed with a question and answer forum (like Quora) with a dash of comment
threads (see Disqus) thrown in for good measure. This site allows you to
add some content, it could be a Tweet, webpage, or original content. You
then invite people to the conversation and watch it take on a life of its
own by branching off into tangents or as the genesis to new conversations.

You can invite as many or as few participants as you would like. You can
close a thread at any time. If you have excluded someone from the thread,
they can still branch off of a comment to start their own thread. There
was some talk about using it as an enterprise sharing system because of the
hyper-curational moderation abilities and it could possibly be used for
project management.

The new “Groups” feature allows you to invite people to groups and then
share amongst each other at any time. This I could see as being
particularly handy for building relationships in teams like those I had to
work in my first semester as a grad student. We didn’t have a lot of time
outside of class to get to know each other, so using a tool like this would
have been helpful to get background information or build consensus in the
group without taking up valuable meeting time. At the same time, we could
share other things that we wanted to get their opinion about and get to
know each other personally as well as professionally.

Branch suggests using its service for publishing original ideas, asking
friends for advice, having a public debate, and sharing media and memories.
Much like Storify, branches can be embedded in other media, so they can be
published to blogs or websites once the conversation has ended. The
service is still trying to gain some traction, but the early adopters seem
to really enjoy it. The staff seems very responsive and are visible
commenting on several branches about the service itself.

There are discovery tools for viewing new branches as well as popular ones.
From the small amount I have done, there also seems to be a recommendation
tool that populates branches you might like based on the content of
branches you have started. Overall, we will have to see if it can find a
niche, but I would definitely consider using it for small group work
especially when laying initial groundwork using a branch can help open up
agenda time for other matters.

This is a guest post by Chris Bulin (@Arduanne), a graduate student
assistant at the Taubman Health Sciences Library.

[image: Inline image 1][image: Inline image 2]

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