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Semana Santa en Astorga
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Image by Ametxa
Penitentes
♫♪♫ La saeta ♫♪♫ Joan Manuel Serrat

Holy Week in Spain
Spain is renowned in the world for its Holy Week traditions. Seville, Malaga, and San Fernando in Cadiz see the most glamorous celebrations, while those of Castille-Leon see the more sombre and solemn events.
A common feature in Spain is the almost general usage of the "nazareno" or penitential robe for some of the participants in the Processions. This garment consists in a tunic, a hood with conical tip ( "capirote") used to conceal the face of the wearer, and sometimes a cloak. The exact colors and forms of these robes depend on the particular procession. The robes were widely used in the medieval period for penitents, who could demonstrate their penance while still masking their identity. (These robes intentionally served as the basis for the traditional uniform for members of the Ku Klux Klan in the United States, ironically a very anti-Catholic organization.) These "Nazarenos" carry processional candles or rough hewn wooden crosses, may walk the city streets barefoot, and, in some places may carry shackles and chains on their feet as penance. In some areas, sections of the participant wear dress freely inspired in the uniforms of the Roman Legion[3].

Holy Week in Seville
Seville arguably holds some of the most elaborate processions for Holy Week. A tradition that dates from Counterreformation times, or even earlier. The "Semana Santa en Sevilla" is notable for featuring the procession of "pasos", lifelike wood sculptures of individual scenes of the events that happened between Jesus’ entry in Jerusalem and his burial, or images of the Virgin Mary showing restained grief for the torture and killing of her son. Some of the images are of great antiquity and artistic masterworks. These "pasos" (which usually weigh over a metric tonne) are physically carried on the neck of costaleros (literally "sack men", for its distinctive -and functional- headdress). The "costaleros" (from 24 to 48) are hidden inside the platform of the "paso", so it seems to walk alone. Historically dock workers were hired to carry the "pasos". From 1973 onward, that task has been universally taken over by the members of the confraternities who organize each procession.
The "pasos" are set up and maintained by hermandades and cofradías, religious brotherhoods, confraternities or sodalities, which precede the "pasos" (up to 3) dressed in penitential robes. Some of the processions are near 3000 persons each. In Seville, but for some officials, "costaleros", acolytes and a few other exceptions every participant must wear penitential robes and be hooded. A brass band may accompany the group, playing funereal religious hymns or "marchas" written for the occasion. Some processions are silent with no musical accompaniment. As each procession leaves its home church, called a salida, as well at its return (the entrada) and along the march route there are special extemporaneous songs offered by individuals in the crowd or a balcony. This songs are generically called saetas (arrows).
A total of 58 processions (as of 2007) occur during the week, from Palm Sunday through Easter Sunday morning. On Maundy Thursday there are two sets of processions. One group occurs during the afternoon and evening. The second set begins near midnight and continues until early afternoon on Good Friday. The most famous processions occur this night (the madrugá), including Jesus del Gran Poder, Esperanza – Macarena, and Esperanza – Triana.

León, Spain
Holy Week processions in León are also very popular, with more than 15,000 papones (penitents) on the streets. Processions begin on "Viernes de Dolores" (the Friday in the week before Holy Week) until Easter Sunday. The most solemn and famous procession is the "Procesion de los Pasos" also known as the "Procesion del Encuentro"(Procession of the Meeting). During this marathonian procession, which lasts nine hours, about 4,000 penitents carry 13 "pasos" around all the city. The most solemn moment is El Encuentro (The Meeting) when the pasos representing Saint John and La Dolorosa face one to the other and are "bailados" (penitents move the paso like Saint John and La Dolorosa were dancing).
Also famous is a secular procession, called Entierro de San Genarín (Burial of Saint Genarín). In 1929 on Maundy Thursday night a poor alcoholic person, called Genaro Blanco was run over by the first garbage truck in León. The procession consists of a march through the city with Orujo at the head of the procession to the front of the city walls where the man was supposedly run over and then cheese, a bottle of Orujo and two oranges are left at the spot.

Wikipedia

Semana Santa en Astorga
dating tips men

Image by Ametxa
Penitentes
♫♪♫ La saeta ♫♪♫ Joan Manuel Serrat

Holy Week in Spain

Spain is renowned in the world for its Holy Week traditions. Seville, Malaga, and San Fernando in Cadiz see the most glamorous celebrations, while those of Castille-Leon see the more sombre and solemn events.
A common feature in Spain is the almost general usage of the "nazareno" or penitential robe for some of the participants in the Processions. This garment consists in a tunic, a hood with conical tip ( "capirote") used to conceal the face of the wearer, and sometimes a cloak. The exact colors and forms of these robes depend on the particular procession. The robes were widely used in the medieval period for penitents, who could demonstrate their penance while still masking their identity. (These robes intentionally served as the basis for the traditional uniform for members of the Ku Klux Klan in the United States, ironically a very anti-Catholic organization.) These "Nazarenos" carry processional candles or rough hewn wooden crosses, may walk the city streets barefoot, and, in some places may carry shackles and chains on their feet as penance. In some areas, sections of the participant wear dress freely inspired in the uniforms of the Roman Legion[3].

Holy Week in Seville
Seville arguably holds some of the most elaborate processions for Holy Week. A tradition that dates from Counterreformation times, or even earlier. The "Semana Santa en Sevilla" is notable for featuring the procession of "pasos", lifelike wood sculptures of individual scenes of the events that happened between Jesus’ entry in Jerusalem and his burial, or images of the Virgin Mary showing restained grief for the torture and killing of her son. Some of the images are of great antiquity and artistic masterworks. These "pasos" (which usually weigh over a metric tonne) are physically carried on the neck of costaleros (literally "sack men", for its distinctive -and functional- headdress). The "costaleros" (from 24 to 48) are hidden inside the platform of the "paso", so it seems to walk alone. Historically dock workers were hired to carry the "pasos". From 1973 onward, that task has been universally taken over by the members of the confraternities who organize each procession.
The "pasos" are set up and maintained by hermandades and cofradías, religious brotherhoods, confraternities or sodalities, which precede the "pasos" (up to 3) dressed in penitential robes. Some of the processions are near 3000 persons each. In Seville, but for some officials, "costaleros", acolytes and a few other exceptions every participant must wear penitential robes and be hooded. A brass band may accompany the group, playing funereal religious hymns or "marchas" written for the occasion. Some processions are silent with no musical accompaniment. As each procession leaves its home church, called a salida, as well at its return (the entrada) and along the march route there are special extemporaneous songs offered by individuals in the crowd or a balcony. This songs are generically called saetas (arrows).
A total of 58 processions (as of 2007) occur during the week, from Palm Sunday through Easter Sunday morning. On Maundy Thursday there are two sets of processions. One group occurs during the afternoon and evening. The second set begins near midnight and continues until early afternoon on Good Friday. The most famous processions occur this night (the madrugá), including Jesus del Gran Poder, Esperanza – Macarena, and Esperanza – Triana.

León, Spain
Holy Week processions in León are also very popular, with more than 15,000 papones (penitents) on the streets. Processions begin on "Viernes de Dolores" (the Friday in the week before Holy Week) until Easter Sunday. The most solemn and famous procession is the "Procesion de los Pasos" also known as the "Procesion del Encuentro"(Procession of the Meeting). During this marathonian procession, which lasts nine hours, about 4,000 penitents carry 13 "pasos" around all the city. The most solemn moment is El Encuentro (The Meeting) when the pasos representing Saint John and La Dolorosa face one to the other and are "bailados" (penitents move the paso like Saint John and La Dolorosa were dancing).
Also famous is a secular procession, called Entierro de San Genarín (Burial of Saint Genarín). In 1929 on Maundy Thursday night a poor alcoholic person, called Genaro Blanco was run over by the first garbage truck in León. The procession consists of a march through the city with Orujo at the head of the procession to the front of the city walls where the man was supposedly run over and then cheese, a bottle of Orujo and two oranges are left at the spot.

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