Dating Advice for Women #5: Flirting with Hottie Guys

lovein90days.comDating advice expert, Dr. Diana Kirschner, assisted by blogger pup, Madison, teaches you simple yet powerful flirting tips designed to help you attract and date great men! Each dating advice webisode gives you three different flirting tips based on Dr. Diana’s bestselling new dating book, Love in 90 Days. For a free dating advice course go to http and sign up in the Love Etips box. You will get 11 free dating tip lessons that help you feel more confident and ready for flirting and attracting the men you really want!
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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Flirting Tips: Attract Women With 2 Easy Steps

www.meetyoursweet.com For men looking for flirting tips to help them attract women in 2 easy steps, Meet Your Sweet has a video that will help answer the many questions you have about flirting.

A viewer wants some ways to flirt that actually work! Marie has some ideas on how to get to know someone, but flirting may or may not work, depending on the situation.
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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How to Flirt : A Guide for Guys Reviews

How to Flirt : A Guide for Guys

Guys are often taught to be strong and silent, but that doesn’t work well when you’re trying to flirt! Learn the secrets of flirting that get you close to the girls without turning you into the class clown. This 78-page ebook will teach you ways of flirting for all situations – from the girl you’ve never even talked to to the female friend that you want to get even closer with. It tackles common challenges such as shyness and nervousness. There are tips for getting a “yes” to that first date req

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genius waitress

A few nice flirting tips images I found:

genius waitress
flirting tips

Image by ondrej.lipar
Of the genius waitress, I now sing.

Of hidden knowledge, buried ambition, and secret sonnets scribbled on cocktail napkins; of aching arches, ranting cooks, condescending patrons, and eyes diverted from ancient Greece to ancient grease; of burns and pinches and savvy and spunk; of a uniquely American woman living a uniquely American compromise, I sing. I sing of the genius waitress.

Okay, okay, she’s probably not really a genius. But she is well-educated. She has a degree in Sanskrit, ethnoastronomy, Icelandic musicology, or something equally valued in contemporary marketplace. Even if she could find work in her chosen field, it wouldn’t pay beans–so she slings them instead. (The genuis waitress is not to be confused with the aspiring-actress waitress, so prevalent in Manhattan and Los Angeles and so different from her sister in temperament and I.Q.)

As a type, the genius waitress is sweet and sassy, funny and smart; young, underestimated, fatalistic, weary, cheery (not happy, cheerful: there’s a difference and she understands it), a tad bohemian, often borderline alcoholic, frequently pretty (though her hair reeks of kitchen and bar); as independent as a cave bear (though ever hopeful of "true love") and, above all, geniune.

Covertly sentimental, she fusses over toddlers and old folks, yet only fear of unemployment prevents her from handing an obnoxious customer his testicles with his bill.

She doesn’t mind a little good-natured flirting, and if you flirt with verve and wit, she may flirt back. Never, however, never try to impress her with your resume. Her tolerance for pretentious Yuppies ends with her shift, sometimes earlier. She reads men like a menu and always knows when she’s being offered leftovers or an artificially inflated souffle.

Should you ever be lucky enough to be taken home by her to that studio apartment with the jerry-built bookshelves and Frida Kahlo posters, you will discover that whereas in the public dining room she is merely as proficient as she needs to be, in the private bedroom she is blue gourmet virtuoso. Five stars and counting! Afterward, you can discuss chaos theory or the triple aspects of the mother goddess in universal art forms–while you massage her swollen feet.

Eventually, she leaves food service for graduate school or marriage; but unless she wins a grant or a fair divorce settlement, chances are she’ll be back, a few years down the line, reciting the daily specials with her own special mixture of warmth and ennui.

Erudite emissary of eggs over easy, polymath purveyor of polenta and prawns, articulate angel of apple pie, the genius waitress is on duty right now in hundreds of U.S. restaurants, smile at the ready, sauce on the side. So brush up on your Schopenhauer, place your order–and tip, mister, tip. She deserves a break today.

Of her, I sing.

Tom Robbins
Playboy, 1991

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Nice Flirting Tips photos

Check out these flirting tips images:

Palming Card Trick Magic Macro 10-19-09 3
flirting tips

Image by stevendepolo
For macro Mondays-Magic

www.zna.com.tw/blog/?p=470
www.revealedtricks.com/tag/magic-tricks-revealed
www.zdnet.com.au/dangerous-fake-public-wi-fi-lives-on-in-…
www.lynxeffect.com/uk/home/blog/2010/11/29/video-flirting…
www.zna.com.tw/blog2/?p=324
blogdemagia.com/2011/12/30/magia-de-numeros-y-cartas-el-t…
www.sebarin.com/blogging/swag-bucks-tips-and-tricks.htm

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Nice Flirting Tips photos

A few nice flirting tips images I found:

Nell Gwynne, actress and Mistress of Charles II
flirting tips

Image by lisby1
Eleanor "Nell" Gwyn (or Gwynn or Gwynne) (1650 – 14 November 1687), was one of the earliest English actresses to receive prominent recognition, and a long-time mistress of King Charles II.

Called "pretty, witty Nell" by Samuel Pepys, she has been called a living embodiment of the spirit of Restoration England and has come to be considered a folk heroine, with a story echoing the rags-to-royalty tale of Cinderella.

Elizabeth Howe, in The First English Actresses, says she was "the most famous Restoration actress of all time, possessed of an extraordinary comic talent."[1] By Charles, Nell had two sons, Charles Beauclerk (1670-1726) and James Beauclerk (1671-1680). Charles was the first Earl of Burford, later Duke of St. Albans.

Very little is reliably known about Nell Gwyn’s background. Her mother was Helena (or perhaps Eleanor) Gwyn, née Smith; contemporaries referred to her as "Old Madam Gwyn" or simply "Madam Gwyn". Madam Gwyn was born within the parish of St Martin-in-the-Fields, London, and is thought to have lived most of her life in the city. She is believed by most Gwyn biographers to have been low-born; Beauclerk calls this conjecture, based solely on what is known of her later life. Nell Gwyn’s father was, according to most sources, Thomas Gwyn, a Captain in the Cavalier Army during the English Civil War.[2]

Three cities make the claim to be Nell Gwyn’s birthplace: Hereford, London (specifically Covent Garden), and Oxford. Evidence for any one of the three is scarce.[3] The fact that "Gwyn" is a name of Welsh origin might support Hereford, as its county is on the border with Wales; The Dictionary of National Biography notes a traditional belief that she was born there in Pipe Well Lane, renamed to Gwynne Street in the 19th century. London is the simplest choice, perhaps, since Nell’s mother was born there and that is where she raised her children. Alexander Smith’s 1715 Lives of the Court Beauties says she was born in Coal Yard Alley in Covent Garden and other biographies, including Wilson’s, have followed suit. Beauclerk pieces together circumstantial evidence to favor an Oxford birth. The location may remain a mystery, but the time does not: a horoscope cast for Nell Gwyn pinpoints it as Saturday 2 February 1650, at six o’clock in the morning.[4]

One way or another, Nell’s father seems to have been out of the picture by the time of her childhood in Covent Garden, and her mother was left in a low situation. Old Madam Gwyn was by most accounts an obese brandy-swigging alcoholic whose business was running a bawdy house (a brothel). There, or in the bawdy house of one Madam Ross, Nell would spend at least some time. It is possible she worked herself as a child prostitute; Peter Thomson, in the Oxford Illustrated History of Theatre, says it is "probable". A rare mention of her upbringing from the source herself might be seen to contradict the idea: A 1667 entry in Samuel Pepys’ diary records, second-hand,

Here Mrs. Pierce tells me [...] that Nelly and Beck Marshall, falling out the other day, the latter called the other my Lord Buckhurst’s whore. Nell answered then, "I was but one man’s whore, though I was brought up in a bawdy-house to fill strong waters to the guests; and you are a whore to three or four, though a Presbyter’s praying daughter!" which was very pretty.[5]

It is not out of the question that Gwyn was merely echoing the satirists of the day, if she said this at all.

Various anonymous verses are the only other sources describing her childhood occupations: bawdyhouse servant, street hawker of herring, oysters or turnips, and cinder-girl have all been put forth.[6] Tradition has her growing up in Coal Yard Alley, a poor slum off Drury Lane.

Around 1662, Nell is said to have taken a lover by the name of Duncan or Dungan. Their relationship lasted perhaps two years and was reported with obscenity-laced acidity in several later satires. ("For either with expense of purse or p—k, / At length the weary fool grew Nelly-sick".[7]) Duncan provided Gwyn with rooms at a tavern in Maypole Alley, and the satires also say he was involved in securing Nell a job at the theatre being built nearby.

Charles II had been restored to the English throne in 1660, after a decade of protectorate rule by the Cromwells, when pastimes regarded as frivolous, including theatre, had been banned. One of Charles’ early acts as King was to license the formation of two acting companies, and in 1663 the King’s Company, led by Thomas Killigrew, opened a new playhouse, the Theatre in Bridges Street (later rebuilt and renamed the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane).

Mary Meggs, a former prostitute nicknamed "Orange Moll" and a friend of Madam Gwyn’s, had been granted the licence to "vend, utter and sell oranges, lemons, fruit, sweetmeats and all manner of fruiterers and confectioners wares" within the theatre.[8] Orange Moll hired Nell and her older sister Rose as "orange-girls", selling the small, sweet "china" oranges to the audience inside the theatre for a sixpence each.

The work exposed her to multiple aspects of theatre life and to London’s higher society: this was after all the "King’s playhouse" and Charles frequently enough attended the performances. The orange-girls would also serve as messengers between men in the audience and actresses backstage; they received monetary tips for this role and certainly some of these messages would end in sexual assignations. Whether this activity rose to the level of pimping may be a matter of semantics. Some sources think it also likely that Gwyn prostituted herself during her time as an orange-girl.

The new theatres were the first in England to feature actresses; earlier, women’s parts were played by boys or men. Gwyn joined the rank of actresses at Bridges Street when she was fourteen, less than a year after becoming an orange-girl.

If her good looks, strong clear voice, and lively wit were responsible for catching the eye of Killigrew, she still had to prove herself clever enough to succeed as an actress. This was no mean task in the Restoration theatre; the limited pool of audience members meant that very short runs were the norm for plays and fifty different productions might be mounted in the nine-month season lasting from September to June.[10]

Gwyn was illiterate her entire life (signing her initials "E.G." would be the extent of her ability to read or write), adding an extra complication to the memorisation of her lines.

Late in 1667, George Villiers, 2nd Duke of Buckingham took on the role of unofficial manager for Gwyn’s love life. He aimed to provide King Charles II someone who would move aside Barbara Palmer, his principal current mistress (and Buckingham’s cousin), moving Buckingham closer to King’s ear. The plan failed; reportedly, Gwyn asked £500 a year to be kept and this was rejected as too dear a price. Buckingham had a backup, though: he was also involved in successful maneuvers to match the King with Moll Davis, an actress with the rival Duke’s Company.[25] Davis would be Nell’s first rival for the King. Several anonymous satires from the time relate a tale of Gwyn, with the help of her friend Aphra Behn, slipping a powerful laxative into Davis’ tea-time cakes before an evening when she was expected in the king’s bed.[26]

Romance between the King and Gwyn began in April of 1668, if the stories are correct: Gwyn was attending a performance of George Etherege’s She Wou’d if She Cou’d at the theatre in Lincoln’s Inn Fields. In the next box was the King, who from accounts was more interested in flirting with Nell than watching the play. Charles invited Nell and her date (a Mr. Villiers, a cousin of Buckingham’s) to supper, along with his brother James, the Duke of York. The anecdote turns charming if perhaps apocryphal at this point: the King, after supper, discovered that he had no money on him; nor did his brother. Gwyn had to foot the bill. "Od’s fish!" she exclaimed, in an imitation of the King’s manner of speaking, "but this is the poorest company I ever was in!"[27]

Previously having been the mistress of Charles Hart and Charles Sackville, she jokingly titled the King "her Charles the Third". By the summer of 1668, Gwyn’s affair with the King was well-known, though there was little reason to believe it would last for long. She continued to act at the King’s House, her new notoriety drawing larger crowds and encouraging the playwrights to craft more roles specifically for her. June 1668 found her in Dryden’s An Evening’s Love, or The Mock Astrologer, and in July she played in Lacy’s The Old Troop. This was a farce about a company of Cavalier soldiers during the English Civil War, based on Lacy’s own experiences. Possibly, Nell Gwyn’s father had served in the same company, and Gwyn’s part — the company whore — was based on her own mother.[28] As her commitment to the king increased, though, her acting career slowed, and she had no recorded parts between January and June of 1669, when she played Valeria in Dryden’s very successful tragedy Tyrannick Love.[29]

King Charles II had a considerable number of mistresses through his life, both short affairs and committed arrangements. He also had a wife, the Queen consort Catherine of Braganza, who was in an awkward position in several ways: made pregnant, she consistently miscarried, and she had little or no say over Charles’ choice to have mistresses. This had come to a head shortly after their 1662 marriage, in a confrontation between Catherine and Barbara Palmer that became known as the "Bedchamber crisis". Ostracised at court and with most of her retinue sent back to her home nation of Portugal, Catherine had been left with little choice but to acquiesce to Charles’ mistresses being granted semi-official standing.

During Gwyn’s first years with Charles, there was little competition in the way of other mistresses: Barbara Palmer was on her way out in most respects certainly in terms of age and looks and others, such as Moll Davis, kept quietly away from the spotlight of public appearances or Whitehall. Nell gave birth to her first son, Charles, on 8 May 1670. This was the King’s seventh son — by five separate mistresses.

In February 1671, Nell moved into a brick townhouse at 79 Pall Mall.[32] The property was owned by the crown and its current resident was instructed to transfer the lease to Gwyn. It would be her main residence for the rest of her life. Gwyn seemed unsatisfied with being a leasee only – in 1673 we are told in a letter of Joseph Williamson that "Madam Gwinn complains she has no house yett." Gwyn is said to have complained that "she had always conveyed free under the Crown, and always would; and would not accept [the house] till it was conveyed free to her by an Act of Parliament." In 1676, Gwyn would in fact be granted the freehold to the property, which would remain in her family until 1693; as of 1960 the property was still the only one on the south side of Pall Mall not owned by the Crown.

Nell Gwyn gave birth to her second child by the King, James, on 25 December 1671. Sent to school in Paris when he was six, he would die there in 1681. The circumstances of the child’s life in Paris and the cause of his death are both unknown, one of the few clues being that he died "of a sore leg", which Beauclerk (p. 300) speculates could mean anything from an accident to poison.

There are two variations about how the elder of her two children by Charles was given the Earldom of Burford, both of which are unverifiable: The first (and most popular) is that when Charles was six years old, on the arrival of the King, Nell said, "Come here, you little bastard, and say hello to your father." When the King protested her calling Charles that, she replied, "Your Majesty has given me no other name by which to call him." In response, Charles made him the Earl of Burford. Another is that Nell grabbed Charles and hung him out of a window (or over a river) and threatened to drop him unless Charles was granted a peerage. The King cried out "God save the Earl of Burford!" and subsequently officially created the peerage, saving his son’s life. On 21 December 1676, a warrant was passed for "a grant to Charles Beauclerc, the King’s natural son, and to the heirs male of his body, of the dignities of Baron of Heddington, co.Oxford, and Earl of Burford in the same county, with remainder to his brother, James Beauclerc, and the heirs male of his body." [33] A few weeks later, James was given "the title of Lord Beauclerc, with the place and precedence of the eldest son of an earl." [33]

Shortly afterwards, the King granted Burford House, on the edge of the Home Park in Windsor, to Nell and their son. She lived there when the King was in residence at the Castle. In addition to the properties mentioned above, Nell had a summer residence on the site of what is now 61-63 King’s Cross Road, which enjoyed later popularity as the Bagnigge Wells Spa. According to the London Encyclopedia (Macmillan, 1983) she "entertained Charles II here with little concerts and breakfasts". An inscribed stone of 1680, saved and reinserted in the front wall of the present building, shows a carved mask which is probably a reference to her stage career.

Just after the death of Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans at the turn of the year, on 5 January 1684, King Charles granted his son Charles, Earl of Burford, the title of Duke of St Albans, gave him an allowance of £1,000 a year, and granted him the offices of Chief Ranger of Enfield Chace and Master of the Hawks in reversion (i. e. after the death of the current incumbents).

King Charles died on 6 February 1685. James II, obeying his brother’s deathbed wish, "Let not poor Nelly starve," eventually paid most of Gwyn’s debts off and gave her a pension of 1500 pounds a year. He also paid off the mortgage on Gwyn’s Nottinghamshire lodge in Bestwood, which would remain in the Beauclerk family until 1940.[35] At the same time, James applied pressure to Nell and her son Charles to convert to Roman Catholicism, something she resisted.

In March of 1687, Gwyn suffered a stroke that left her paralysed on one side. In May, a second stroke left her confined to the bed in her Pall Mall house; she made out her will on 9 July. Nell Gwyn died on 14 November 1687, at ten in the evening, less than three years after the King’s death. She was 37 years old. Although she left considerable debts, she left a legacy to the Newgate prisoners in London.

She was buried in the Church of St Martin-in-the-Fields, London, after a funeral in which Thomas Tenison, the Archbishop of Canterbury, preached a sermon on the text of Luke 15:7 "Just so, I tell you, there will be more joy in heaven over one sinner who repents than over ninety-nine righteous persons who need no repentance."

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Pick-up Lines That Work

Pick-up Lines That Work
Pick-up Lines That Work: Get The Girl Tonight Is A Necessary Addition To Any Bachelors Liabrary.
Pick-up Lines That Work

No More Jealousy
Get Ready To Learn How To Stop The Jealousy Now Before It Rips Your Relationship To Shreds…stop Jealous Thoughts..release Fears–new Book And Audio Program From Susie & Otto Collins Shows You How…
No More Jealousy

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